Tag Archives: writing

‘Does your book have any romance?’

7 May

We were sitting in this high-rise apartment, this stranger and I, J, talking about my novel. Sipping on some mixture of pale Moscato and red wine he’d poured, not realizing I wasn’t really into wine.

I like juice and whiskey, I said. Oh, then you might like this, J assured me.

He kept pouring. Turned out the drink was alright.

J was a writer, too. He understood. Though, when he asked the question, “Does your book have any romance?” I fell quiet for a moment then gave him this kind of wry, bitter laugh.

That he didn’t understand. He furrowed his brow, so I had to explain.

“The men in the novel aren’t exactly romantic. One tries to be, but it doesn’t come across that way because he’s too forceful; the other’s profession involves manipulating the protagonist to do something she normally wouldn’t do. I can’t really call that romance.”

J didn’t have much to say about that. The night carried on regardless.

Why There Isn’t Any ‘Real’ Romance in My Novel

Photo by Nathan Walker.

Continue reading

Writing Vlog #2: Planning a (Fantasy) Series

19 Mar

Today is the day Tiyana explains how she actually sat down and thought about the future of her fantasy series…

…after 10 years of working on the first novel, heh.

 

I’m amazed and how much my brain can come up with simply by listening to music. (A lot of this I actually talked about in the “goals” portion of my last blog post, so this may be a little redundant for blog readers. However, if you like videos more than text, then voilà!)

How do you plan for a novel series?

If you’re working on one, that is. 🙂 (Or have worked on in the past.)

Channeling Your Emotions into Dark Writing Themes & Writing Complex Characters + Goals Update

4 Mar

Last weekend, I released a new YouTube video discussing the idea of channeling your own emotions in order to tackle dark themes in your writing and how this can result in more complex characters. Also, I reference some of my personal life experiences and explain how they manifest in my writing.

 

I really believe that if you’re going to play with any particular theme in a story—be it light or dark—then it’s important to come from a personal place when doing so. Otherwise, you run the risk of writing a story that does not emotionally resonate with readers in an authentic way and instead comes across more like a dry essay or intellectual exercise in flexing your technical literary muscles.

At least, this has been my experience while wrestling with my WIP and reading other people’s writing. Continue reading

On the Importance of Being ‘Black’ & the Burden of ‘Proof’

1 Mar

Today, I was watching an interesting YouTube video by a biracial writer named Maya Goode, who was discussing the topic of “do I have to ‘prove my blackness as a writer?'”—to which my response would be a resounding hell no.

Allow me to explain.

‘Blackness,’ Today, Retains a Mindset of Enslavement, Sadly

To be honest, I’ve always found it mind-boggling how biracial people can be treated in the United States. My cousins, who are mixed, have always talked about feeling as if they never really “fit in” with blacks or whites. Yet, as for me and my black family and how I didn’t grow up with “the struggle” of being poor, I have constantly been reminded of this—especially by my mixed cousins. How could I possibly understand what it means to be black when I haven’t even had to “struggle?”

Personally, I don’t care for being black. At all. “Black” is a prison some choose to erect around themselves in order to feel safe then force onto others who make them feel unsafe.

Why would I want to be “black” when so many other “black” people have failed to accept me—the same “blacks” who are constantly trying to find ways to invalidate other people’s experiences so they can elevate their experiences over that of others, just so they can feel better about themselves? That is the most enslaving attitude a person can choose to cling to all of his or her life, and I refuse to live that way.

It’s like certain black Americans today simply refuse to just let go of the idea of slavery…despite that it’s everything our ancestors have suffered for and fought so hard against. (Oddly enough, I don’t think this mindset restricts itself to the black community.)

What good is there in limiting your creative potential to ethnic or cultural expectations? Continue reading

Writing Vlog #1: Plotting & Editing a Fantasy Novel

4 Feb

So today, I decided to post a vlog about where I am with my WIP novel, The Elementalist: Rise of Hara. Basically, I discuss the methods I’ve tried, what’s worked for me, what hasn’t, etc…and what that all amounts to: in the end, you just have to try different things and find out what works for you!

 

In other news, today has been a very sad day for me.  I decided it was necessary to put my two kitty cats, Kit Kat and Tigger (shown in the video), to sleep. 😦 I’m incredibly sad about it so won’t go into the details today, but I plan on talking about it in a more appropriately-themed post a few weeks from now.

Anyway, that’s all for now. 🙂 Thanks for reading/watching!

Why I Write Fantasy

22 Jan

Quick note: just posted a new short-ish video on YouTube talking about why, and how, I decided to start writing fantasy stories! (It’s 15 minutes long—short for me, anyway.)

Why do you write/read fantasy?

What drew you/continues to draw you to this genre? Or alternatively, what do you like about reading fantasy stories? Let me know in the comments!

Quote from Patrick Rothfuss

18 Jan

A quote that basically sums up the struggle that has been my writing life, from this interview with Patrick Rothfuss on Wired:

There was so much that wasn’t in those initial drafts, simply because I had no idea what I was doing in terms of structuring a story. I put words together fine. I could write dialog and scene. I could even make an interesting chapter. But a book is so much more than a series of interesting chapters. And that’s what it took me a fucking decade to figure out.

15 years, he says, it took him to finish The Name of the Wind.

Good news, guys: I’m only on my 10th!

Coloring Your Writing with Words

7 Jan

As a visual merchandiser with a background in interior design, I tend to see the world in a very visually-oriented way. This even applies to my writing. People who have read some of my flash fiction or story snippets often mention they get a strong sense of place and really feel like they are in the settings I write about, and I think my ability to use elements such as color and space to manipulate atmosphere in the physical world really has a lot to do with this!

I’ve been wanting to make a video talking about how our words as writers are as important as colors are to artists and designers; there are so many to choose from and they can really “color” our writing!

 

This isn’t really a “how to” video so much as it is a reminder for us writers to really pay attention to the words we choose when telling our stories and how we use them—something that’s definitely been on my mind while editing my WIP.

Some of the leading English dictionaries have close to half a million words in them, which is pretty amazing when you think about it! Not to mention, our language is always evolving, as new words and turns of phrases seem to pop up just about each year in everyday use. It can be easy reverting to our personal go-to words to the point where, when we go back and look at our writing, they stand out as being overused. Keeping a thesaurus handy in such instances as well as being mindful of what words we choose to tell our stories with can be helpful. (There are times I know there’s a better word and I can’t remember it; then I search thesaurus.com for similar words and am like, “Ah-ha! That’s the one!”)

Anyway, this video is just an exercise in word choice and how the words we choose can be used to create context, subtext, mood, tone, or whatever else we aim to achieve in our stories.

How do you “color your writing?”

Story Excerpt – The Elementalist: Rise of Hara, Chapter 1

5 Dec

Hello, everyone! So I’m still in Summerlin and had a really, really long night (pulled a 13.5 hour shift). Regardless, it’s been a while since I posted a new video for my YouTube channel, so I decided to record an excerpt of my WIP, The Elementalist: Rise of Hara. I actually read it out loud.

Just like I’ve been doing during my edits!

This one starts not at the very beginning of the story but in the protagonist’s first chapter. The story is setup in “parts,” and Part I is told from another main character’s POV to introduce what’s going on elsewhere in the world, leading up to the protagonist’s role–which I introduce in Part II.

I may record the second chapter sometime, as well, as it introduces the shady government agent who approaches the protagonist, Voi. But we’ll see.

I return home in 3 days, after which I’ll be able to get back to my read-out-loud edits. (I’m not doing it during this trip only because I think differently at night and tend to miss things after 10+ hour shifts…)

What did you think?

Do you like the story so far?  Is it something you would be interested in continuing reading?  I have a few people who’ve volunteered to be beta readers already (yay!), whom I’ll be sending out my manuscript to early next year, so it could change based on their feedback. We’ll see.  But that’s what I have for now.

Anyway, thanks for watching/reading/listening!

Editing, Life & Spy Stuff

27 Nov

A lot has been happening in my life over the past couple of weeks, and not much of it has included editing. I flew to Chicago for a week to see my long-distance boyfriend, whom I hadn’t seen in 5 months (we weren’t always long distance); he was a complete gentleman and romantic during my entire stay. Also, one of my cats has not been feeling well and has lost over 6 pounds from his original weight of 16. Then tomorrow, I’ll be flying to Summerlin, Nevada to help open a new furniture store with Living Spaces, where I work as a visual merchandiser. (This will be my 3rd store opening since I started about 6 months ago.)

In other words, I haven’t had much downtime—and I won’t, for some time.

Store openings are a whirlwind and can be a lot of fun, but they’re also stressful at times.  Last time I did one we only had 9 days to set up everything from scratch (10 for the rest of the team, since I left a day before grand opening), which was a record time for the company. This next one I’m doing will be similar. Like the last, this will be another large store, clocking in at 140,ooo square feet. (These store showrooms are comparable to IKEA’s in size, by the way; IKEA just tends to advertise the sizes of their entire building with the warehouses included.)

In other words, it’s pretty big.

Luckily, I’ll get to see the boyfriend again as soon as January rolls around, which will be nice. In between my return from Summerlin on December 8th and the boyfriend’s arrival 4 weeks thereafter, I should be able to get some more “read-out-loud” editing done.

I’m pretty sure I won’t be able to finish before the end of the year now, unfortunately. Too much has been going on, and my attention has been spread as a result. I’ll have more of a chance to focus on the novel in the upcoming weeks and later in January after the boyfriend has returned to Chicago.

In Other News…

Meanwhile, I’ve been getting some ideas for the next book and keep thinking about a few scenes in particular that have been inspired by some moody, spacey songs I’ve been listening to by a song artist named Koda. (You can find more of his music here.) I also spent a little time tweaking my two ending chapters, as they didn’t quite feel “right” to me—not that they were “wrong,” per se; just not quite “hitting the mark” for me.

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What happens when a drunk air elementalist with claustrophobia tangos with a brooding clairvoyant wrestler at 3AM in a hotel room? Writing about it in a chapter of my fantasy novel, The Elementalist: Rise of Hara, entitled, “Two Tumblers, a Red Dress & a Bottle of Whiskey.” | Image credit: unknown.

Anyway, the second story will be set in new locations inspired by early 20th-century China, Japan, and Saharan regions especially as opposed to the more European-like settings I’m currently writing in.  It will likely be even more espionage-y than the first novel, I’m gathering—mostly because the main characters will be veering off their usual paths and doing a lot more things their governments may/may not approve of (intrigue!), as possibly hinted at by the novel title I have planned: The Elementalist: Revolutionary.

As such, I’ve been gathering inspiration on life in/near the Sahara as well as spies during WWII.

9781447220589the-key-to-rebecca

I started reading an espionage thriller called The Key to Rebecca by Ken Follett, which I’m enjoying so far. It mainly follows a German spy who’s been sent to Cairo, Egypt during WWII, as well as his British intelligence counterpart in an intriguing cat-and-mouse game. I’ve also been watching the miniseries version of a book I once read called The Time In Between, also set around the WWII era. I wrote a blog post about this book a while ago; it was one I really enjoyed.

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The TV series is very well done. Sira Quiroga, a Spanish seamstress turned renowned dressmaker turned spy against the Nazis, is a clever and compelling heroine–with an impeccable sense of style, to boot! If my protagonist Voi Román read her story, I think she would like Sira very much and might even consider her a role model, of sorts.


Anyways, that’s what I’ve been up to. I still need to pack and get ready for my trip to Summerlin, though hopefully, I can get a little editing done before I go. (Once I’m there, it’s 10+ hour work days, and after moving furniture and bending and crouching all day, I know I won’t have the energy to edit then!)

A belated Happy Thanksgiving to all my readers, both old and new!