Tag Archives: plotting

Happy New Year! + 2018 Goals

1 Jan

It’s hard to believe another year has gone by, but it has—and much to my surprise, I’ve pretty much achieved my goals. (This is only surprising to me because usually, I don’t set any goals.)

Last year, I set out to achieve three things: (1) finish editing Book I of my fantasy series, (2) begin planning and writing Book II of said fantasy series, and (3) plan the end of a long-distance relationship I was involved in. (Notice how I used the past tense.)

#1 I’ve done; I’m still not “finished”, per se, but I’m “done” for now. I’ve sent the thing out to beta readers and am currently still getting some feedback to consider. So far so good. (Thought maybe I could be done with the whole beta reader process and edits based on that before now, but that was a joke. Still, I consider this goal “accomplished”.)

#2 I can also check off the list. Barely started actually writing the story just a few days ago so squeaked that one in. (My progress bar on the side of my website now reflects this.) One particular scene was in my head and I just wanted to get it down on paper. Since I’m still waiting on feedback for the first novel, I thought this would be a good time to get the second one going.

As for #3, well, things just didn’t work out with me and the ex-boyfriend. I think we were in very different places in our lives, and our lifestyles were way too different to really coincide. He was a lot more footloose and bohemian than me. Traveled light…that kind of thing. (And here I am collecting vintage furniture I don’t necessarily need.) There’s a certain appeal to that, but if you’re talking about possibly spending the rest of your life together and moving to another state…well, I’ll let you fill in the blanks.

There was also the issue of him changing his tune from “I can see us getting married” and nonchalantly asking me about ring styles to “I’m not sure I want to get married/believe in marriage anymore,” which is enough in and of itself if you ask me. #dealbreaker

That all happened back in February, in addition to having to put down my two very sickly cats of 17 years, and I’ve pretty much been single ever since. Actually, I think I’m a lot happier being single. Looking back on my dating escapades, I think I’ve always been happier single. Doesn’t mean I don’t get curious about men every now and then; I like men. (Well, some of them.) I’m just not sure I ought to be living with one. See, I happen to be responsible with my money, I live a pretty stable life, and I still believe that marriage can be a good thing. Unfortunately, none of those things seem to be en vogue with the guys I run into nowadays. (Because in my past lives, apparently, things were different. </sarcasm>)

I could really go on about this if I’m not careful, but that’s not why I started this post; I’m setting some new goals for the New Year, people. Three of them, to be exact—two that are writing-related and one that’s more personal. After all, that’s what I did last year, so y’know, let’s not get too creative.

Okay, I lied: let’s do two personal goals. There, I’m trying something new now. Continue reading

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Writing Vlog #2: Planning a (Fantasy) Series

19 Mar

Today is the day Tiyana explains how she actually sat down and thought about the future of her fantasy series…

…after 10 years of working on the first novel, heh.

 

I’m amazed at how much my brain can come up with simply by listening to music. (A lot of this I actually talked about in the “goals” portion of my last blog post, so this may be a little redundant for blog readers. However, if you like videos more than text, then voilà!)

How do you plan for a novel series?

If you’re working on one, that is. 🙂 (Or have worked on in the past.)

Writing Vlog #1: Plotting & Editing a Fantasy Novel

4 Feb

So today, I decided to post a vlog about where I am with my WIP novel, The Elementalist: Rise of Hara. Basically, I discuss the methods I’ve tried, what’s worked for me, what hasn’t, etc…and what that all amounts to: in the end, you just have to try different things and find out what works for you!

 

In other news, today has been a very sad day for me.  I decided it was necessary to put my two kitty cats, Kit Kat and Tigger (shown in the video), to sleep. 😦 I’m incredibly sad about it so won’t go into the details today, but I plan on talking about it in a more appropriately-themed post a few weeks from now.

Anyway, that’s all for now. 🙂 Thanks for reading/watching!

Pantser Special: Using Story Structure Models to Write a Synopsis (& Tighten Your Plot)

14 Jan

Not long ago, while editing my novel, it occurred to me that eventually, I’ll be expected to provide a synopsis of my story whenever I do get around to submitting to agents. (The horror!) As someone who started this ginormous project as a bonafide pantser after failing to produce a likable manuscript going the outlining route, well, the idea of writing a synopsis seemed like a big fat joke…until I realized it really wasn’t.

Without a coherent, logical structure, my story would be DOA.

So…when a YouTuber I follow named Shaelin Bishop posted a video about a 15 Beat Plot Structure this week, I decided to tune in and watch. Perhaps, I reasoned, I could learn something useful.

Boy, did I ever!

Now, I’ve read articles about all sorts of story structures in the past—some more detailed than others—but this “15 Beat” one just seemed to really “click” for me. Maybe because I already had my story pretty much figured out this time around; maybe because it’s actually meant for the visual medium of movies, which I tend to see more than I read, and I’m a very visual person. Anyhow, while listening to Shaelin explain it, I was nodding my head along, mentally listing the ways my story already seemed to align with the plot progressions she was explaining.

Phew! What a relief. I guess, without really thinking about it as “creating a plot structure,” that’s exactly what I’ve been doing all along!

Well, this came as a great relief to the-pantser-that-is-me. Maybe, I thought to myself, I should actually try being organized for once and write down this plot of mine now—y’know, just to make sure I’m telling a coherent story. (It certainly is an easier way to examine plot without the multitude of details of worldbuilding and dialogue and what have you getting in the way.) Within a half an hour of drafting my story structure in Word, I realized that this whole little exercise could actually help me tighten my plot.

It could also, potentially, become the starting point for my synopsis! Continue reading

On Planning & Writing A Trilogy (Or Series)

19 Sep

(For more posts like this, check out my “series” tag!)

Some of you probably already know that I’m a pantser; in other words, I don’t really like to plan my writing!

Well, I take that back.

I do like having a little bit of a plan, but it’s so sparse that most probably wouldn’t even consider it “a plan.”  It’s more like this: “I want [insert big event] to happen in [insert cool locale], where the characters then find/achieve [insert objective]!”  Then I just figure out the rest from there.  And I think this only has a chance at working because my WIP is a quest/adventure series; it’s “mission-driven fiction,” essentially.

Not plot-driven, exactly, ’cause I still focus on characters along the way, but in terms of planning I think of the story in terms of missions…if that makes sense.

So yeah.  That seriously has been my plan for an Element 7 trilogy, in a nutshell.  (“What?  A trilogy, you say?”  Yes, dear readers, you read that right.  Though, I should have probably already mentioned that on my E7 page…heh.)

Planning A Trilogy

Why a trilogy, you may ask.

All right.  Well, I have this thing with numbers, in case you haven’t noticed, particularly the numbers 7 and 3–kinda similar to Dan Brown’s obsession with symbols, though maybe to a slightly lesser degree.  3 is just neat and tidy, in my mind.  I also like to use Platonic Solids in my novel (one in particular, for now, until later books…but we won’t get into that right now.)

So I’ve read only a little about how authors like J. K. Rowling went about their work.  Apparently she took around five years to plan the Harry Potter series before writing it, though I can’t recall reading the specifics about how she did this.  (It’s probably out there; I just haven’t had time to look it up, lol.)  Though, honestly, there isn’t really a lot of advice out there for folks who do want to write a trilogy or series (not in comparison to other writing topics, anyways).  Most times it seems writers are actually discouraged from doing so–at least when they are working on their first novel.

Apparently it’s too “cliché,” when you’re writing fantasy…

As for me, “planning” out a trilogy has kinda just naturally been happening while working on this first novel–like I’ll be in the middle of a scene and think to myself, “Hey, that would make for a totally cool thing to explore in Book II/III!”  And then I just plant the seeds, make a note to water them later and roll with it.  (I’ve actually got probably half of Book II planned out by specific scenes I’ve already written or summarized in my journals, with a few ideas for the other half and Book III still subconsciously cooking in my messed-up head.)

But really, all I’m doing is using that basic formula I mentioned at the beginning three times and designing each end objective so that they tie into one another, leading to the final objective in the last novel, while also figuring out the interconnecting threads (those “ah-ha!” moments) along the way.

I bet some people wonder why it would possibly take 5+ years to plan out a bunch of books, but now I’m pretty sure I understand why…

There Are Just SO Many Little Details That Have Got to Work Together!

Especially when you’re writing secondary world fantasy.  Every piece of invented information that’s in that bad-boy-of-a-series is coming from your brain.  It’s like this giant sprawling 50,000-piece puzzle of your own personal design; everything’s gotta fit together.  And when you do sit down to try and put this puzzle together, it typically doesn’t happen overnight.  Plus, you gotta hand craft all those pieces before that can even happen–nope, none of that computer-aided/die cut business.  So you can’t just toss in stuff willy-nilly because you think it’s oh-so-cool (learned that the long, hard way, lol); everything has got to have a reason for being in the novels–or else you have to work backwards and find a gorram reason for all the dangling stuff to matter.

Harder to do, imo, but doable.

When I first started learning how to write a novel my mind just couldn’t even begin to grasp this concept.  “Whaddya mean I can’t just throw in what I want and expect it to work? Bah!  Watch me…”  And y’know how that turned out…

Lots and lots of experimental drafts that went nowhere.

But that’s okay! ’cause I eventually figured out how to make all that cool stuff I originally wanted to shoehorn into the same story actually work together–haha! (Or at least I think I have…lol.)  Plus, I learned oodles, like…

The Importance of Foreshadowing

…which, I think, is extremely important when you’re planning and writing a trilogy.  Foreshadowed details provide rhythm and continuity and are like the threads that bind the novels in a series together–along with recurring themes, characters, settings and/or ideas, which all help to create a sense of unity and cohesiveness.  (Sorry, I’m using those pesky Principles of Art/Design again…but you’ll find them everywhere that good art or designs reside.  Writers and literary critics just tend to use different terminology for them, I think.)

You know how excited you get when you pick up Part II of a book, game or movie series and learn that some of your favorite characters are back?  Or the telltale hint, or sometimes outright slap, of a promise that “hey, there’s more yet to come”?  For me, that’s part of the excitement of reading/watching/playing a series; it’s also one of the reasons I want to write one.  (That, and getting to my favorite “candy bar scenes.”)

…Because I just love the characters so darn much.  And the world.  They’re just people (and places) I’d like to come back to again, to experience their adventures through their eyes.

‘Cause trust me, if I didn’t love them I wouldn’t even still be working on this project, haha.  (5.75 years is a looooong tiiiiime to be attached to the hip with the same old ideas…)

So how do you plan for a trilogy/series?

Or maybe you’ve never worked on one before; that’s cool.  You’ve probably read at least one, though, right?  What kind of things do you like about series?  What do you wish authors who write series did a better job of?

I know one of the reasons I started writing was because of my own “fantasy novel pet peeves;” I thought hey, why do writers keep doing this and that?  Let’s write a story that does it different!

Musings on Story Concept & Length

28 Sep

You know, participating in Madison Woods‘ 100 word Flash Fiction challenges every week and checking out other people’s stories is teaching me several things.  For one it’s teaching me to appreciate how everyone has different strengths.  Some people are really good at creating twists even within the brief space the challenge permits.  Some people are really good at scaring you or creating eerie, creepy stories.  Some are good at communicating emotional truths that move you.

All of this is also helping me recognize things that don’t come naturally to me and require more work on my part.

Plotting

Plotting is not my favorite part of writing.  Figuring out what comes next and tying it all together so the story makes sense is hard, I think.  It’s different for a 100-word story than a 200K one, though.  The former doesn’t take much planning.  You just kind of have to figure it out as you write it, if you don’t see it from the get-go.  You can take that same approach with a longer story, but the longer it is I think the more difficult it’ll be in the end to make it all fit together.  (Not impossible, just difficult.)  Having somewhat of a plan, even if it’s a very sparse one, helps to keep you from wandering by giving you some goals to write towards along the way.

For the most part, though, I prefer to discover things as I write, so plot doesn’t come easy.  It’s more of a byproduct of my explorations, heh.

Another part of plotting I think is challenging is incorporating plot twists.  I don’t usually think about twists when I write, particularly in my flash stories, so if they do pop up, they aren’t likely to be earth-shattering revelations.  Also, it’s hard to know the power of a twist or really “see” it as a twist when you already know the outcome.  In my longer project I have a few, but it’s a mystery to me how well they work or not with the foreshadowing and whatnot ’cause I haven’t shown anyone else yet!  (Not all of it, anyway.)

All things to look forward to in the beta reader stage, I suppose.  This leads to something else I’m learning…

Story Length

Different concepts require different lengths which, in turn, require different ways of going about telling the story.  I feel like most of the flash story ideas I’ve come up with so far have fitted comfortably within the 100-word confines, though I have come across one or two that needed more room to breathe.  I suspect the more stories you write the better you’ll get at predicting how long it needs to be in order to tell it thoroughly.  I knew coming into my Element 7 project that it would be big; I just didn’t know how big at the time.  (The things you get yourself into…)

But larger stories are just a bunch of interconnected ideas presented with a recognizable beginning, middle and end so as to make sense on a whole.  You could deconstruct a longer story into several shorter ones, or you could take a shorter one and develop it into something longer.  (This may seem painfully obvious to others, but I’ve maintained a long-story mindset for so long that it’d never really occurred to me to try shorter stories until recently.)  Story concepts may be modified (shrunken or enlarged) to serve different purposes, though I still think each concept has an inherent story length it wants to be told in.  And perhaps writers have preferred lengths for writing, depending on the kinds of concepts they come up with.  Even after getting involved with these 100-word challenges, I still feel like my native story length is novel length.  That’s where I feel most at home.  I like having more room to explore the complexities of characters, cultures and unusual situations.

In any case, I am glad to be writing shorter stories.  As I’ve mentioned before in comments, it gets you thinking about how to say more with fewer words.  As I comb through my WIP during edits, I’m finding ways to cut out non-necessities (though somehow I often manage to add something even more important within the same length like it’s a trade-off) and condense certain blocks of description while maintaining the core ideas.  I’m not a master at that yet, but it is getting easier.  The end goal is to have every word count for something and contribute to the whole and also to fully realize the concept behind the story–no matter how many words this takes.

Yeah, so that’s what I’ve learned so far between working on 100-word shorts and the chihuahua killer, heh.

What aspects of storytelling are most challenging for you?

Also, do you seem to have an inherent story length, or do you pretty much like to write in all kinds of formats?